Can you do it? Will it work? Is it worth it?

I want to feel competent that I’m doing worthwhile work. Starting a day knowing that, feels like a victory and the sense of autonomy which comes with it translates into a 'there-is-a-way' attitude. That puts me in the zone, and it makes me present.

My guiding values are integrity and sincerity. I’m a learner. I like to know how complex things work, and there’s no reason not to be able to find out. When working on projects, personal or professional, I take care to exercise deliberation without overpowering my intuition. Not easy! It doesn’t have to be easy.

Ok, enough baloney. Now, get back to the pretty pictures.

Contact Info

Fusion viewports screenshot

Philips RCH21s product video

3D animation, rendering & compositing

CAD models were provided by the client. As is often the case with .stp and .igs 3D data exchange formats, certain features may not get recognised and surface trims can cause trouble. In MoI3D, that kind of issues were ironed out and unnecessary geometry was removed. Dense .obj meshes were exported and brought over to Blender for animation. Lighting and rendering were done in Octane Render and finally, compositing took place in Blackmagic Fusion.

Particle effects, fluids, textures and sountrack are royalty free stock.

Rendered at Red Pimiento.
  • ClientPhilips
  • Date1 August, 2017
  • TaskCreate a 2 min. video showing the features of the RCH21s workshop lamp
  • I take credit for3D animation, shading, rendering, compositing
  • I take no credit forLifestyle photography; Product design and engineering; Soundtrack; Copywriting; Graphic design
  • Cool toolsMoI3D; Blender; Photoshop; Octane Render; Blackmagic Design Fusion

Animation

Click on the video to the left to pause it before it's driven you crazy, please.

On another note,  that particular scene was built to illustrate the IP (shockproof) rating of the lamp. Unlike the rest of the animation which was keyframed, that scene was simulated using rigid body dynamics. The camera rig was parented to the lamp. The animation was baked and exported to Alembic.

Rendering

All Alembic scenes were shaded entirely in Octane Render standalone.

On another note,  that particular scene was built to illustrate the IP (shockproof) rating of the lamp. Unlike the rest of the animation which was keyframed, that scene was simulated using rigid body dynamics. The camera rig was parented to the lamp. The animation was baked and exported to Alembic.

Compositing

2D and 3D compositing and final delivery was accomplished in Fusion.

First, a 2D back-to-beauty composite with slight colour corrections. Shader (re-lighting node which uses shading normal AOVs) nodes were used to enhance the contrast of the secondary surface details (like the grip ridges and the housing seams), essentially bringing them out a little bit. The 'relighting' capabilities of those shader nodes are far from ideal, otherwise.

Then, 3D Alembic scenes (the same files used in Octane) with matching cameras were hooked to OpenGL renderers to output several info-passes, such as motion vectors for motion blur and object ID and material ID for generating mattes.

That kind of involved workflow may seem like a little bit of an overkill for the task. However, given the time frame, there was no possibility for re-renders. Re-renders are not just time-consuming for the obvious reason of having to wait for frames to be processed, but also for the increased need for managing the content and replacing and archiving previous sequences. Generating passes directly from the Alembic scenes, inside Fusion, essentially took care of content management right then and there on the fly. Also, at the time of making, the product had not been released yet and there was a chance that the final look will be ever so slightly different.